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Cardiovascular care

To provide best care for our heart patients, we follow guidelines that have been proven by medical research to improve care for heart attack and heart failure patients.

Heart Attack Treatment Data

Heart attacks are caused when a blood vessel that supplies the heart, called the coronary artery, is blocked. To provide our patients with the best care based on medical evidence, we follow treatments that have been shown by research to save and improve lives. Please review the table below to see how we compare with our peers for recommended treatment.

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Patients given PCI within 90 minutes of arrival

  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 98%
  • U.S. average - 96%

This measures the percentage of heart attack patients who have a clogged heart artery unblocked within 90 minutes of arriving at the hospital. The technique used to open a clogged artery is called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). It uses an inflating balloon to widen a blocked heart artery. This is important because a blocked blood supply to the heart can cause lasting damage, and PCI reopens blood flow to the heart.

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data
Patients Given A Prescription for a Statin at Discharge
  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 99%
  • U.S. average - 98%

Statins are drugs used to lower cholesterol, a necessary type of fat in all people's blood. Cholesterol levels that are too high can increase your chance of heart attack, stroke and other health problems. For patients who have had a heart attack and have high cholesterol, taking statins can lower the chance that they'll have another heart attack or die from a heart attack. This measure shows the percentage of patients who had a heart attack who received a prescription for a statin before being sent home from the hospital.

Heart Attack Outcomes Data

In addition to collecting data on how well hospitals follow proven best treatments for treating heart attack (which medical professional call "process measures" because they measure how well a hospital follows a proven "process," or treatment), CMS also measures the outcomes of the treatments.

To measure patients' outcomes, or the results of their treatment, CMS tracks 30-day mortality  rates and 30-day readmission rates. Please review the table below to see how we compare with our peers for each measurement of treatment outcomes.

30-Day Mortality Rate

For the heart attack 30-day mortality rate measurement, CMS tracks the percentage of Medicare patients who die of any cause while in the hospital or within 30 days of leaving the hospital.

To evaluate hospitals' performance, CMS gathers the mortality rates of all hospitals and uses them to calculate an average mortality rate. To allow for statistical variation, the range of mortality rates considered average includes rates that may be higher or lower than the exact average rate.

Finally, CMS compares individual hospitals' mortality rates against the average mortality rate. If a hospital falls into the average range, it is considered "no different than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's mortality rate is higher than the average range, it is considered "worse than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's mortality rate is lower than the average range, it is considered "better than the U.S. national rate."

Heart Attack Re-Admission Rates

For the heart attack 30-day re-admission rate measurement, CMS tracks the percentage of Medicare patients who need to go back into a hospital within 30 days. If a hospital's re-admission rates are higher than average, it could mean that patients are being sent home too early or do not fully understand how to care for themselves after leaving the hospital.

To evaluate hospitals' performance, CMS gathers the re-admission rates of all hospitals and uses them to calculate an average re-admission rate. To allow for statistical variation, the range of re-admission rates considered average includes rates that may be higher or lower than the exact average rate.

Finally, CMS compares individual hospitals' re-admission rates against the average re-admission rate. If a hospital falls into the average range, it is considered "no different than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's re-admission rate is higher than the average range, it is considered "worse than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's re-admission rate is lower than the average range, it is considered "better than the U.S. national rate."

Heart Failure Treatment Data

Heart failure is a health condition in which heart muscle is too weak to pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. To provide our patients with the best care based on medical evidence, we follow treatments that have been shown by research to save and improve lives. Please review the table below to see how we compare with our peers for each recommended treatment.

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Patients Given Discharge Instructions

  • MU Health Care average - 98%
  • Missouri average - 92%
  • U.S. average - 95%
July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Patients Given Evaluation of Left Ventricular Systolic Function

  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 98%
  • U.S. average - 99%

This measures the percentage of heart failure patients whose main pumping chamber of their hearts, called the left ventricle, was checked during their hospital stay.This is important to ensure heart failure patients receive proper treatment.

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Patients Given ACE Inhibitors or ARB for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfuntion

  • MU Health Care average - 91%
  • Missouri average - 96%
  • U.S. average - 97%

This measures the percentage of heart failure patients who are prescribed certain medications. These medicines, called angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), help some patients whose hearts have difficulty pumping blood throughout the body.

Heart Failure Outcomes Data

In addition to collecting data on how well hospitals follow proven best treatments for treating heart failure (which medical professional call "process measures" because they measure how well a hospital follows a proven "process," or treatment), CMS also measures the outcomes of the treatments.

To measure patients' outcomes, or the results of their treatment, CMS tracks 30-day mortality  rates and 30-day readmission rates. Please review the table below to see how we compare with our peers for each measurement of treatment outcomes.

30-Day Mortality Rate

For the heart failure 30-day mortality rate measurement, CMS tracks the percentage of Medicare patients who die of any cause while in the hospital or within 30 days of leaving the hospital.

To evaluate hospitals' performance, CMS gathers the mortality rates of all hospitals and uses them to calculate an average mortality rate. To allow for statistical variation, the range of mortality rates considered average includes rates that may be higher or lower than the exact average rate.

Finally, CMS compares individual hospitals' mortality rates against the average mortality rate. If a hospital falls into the average range, it is considered "no different than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's mortality rate is higher than the average range, it is considered "worse than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's mortality rate is lower than the average range, it is considered "better than the U.S. national rate."

30-Day Re-Admission Rate

For the heart failure 30-day re-admission rate measurement, CMS tracks the percentage of Medicare patients who need to go back into a hospital within 30 days. If a hospital's re-admission rates are higher than average, it could mean that patients are being sent home too early or do not fully understand how to care for themselves after leaving the hospital.

To evaluate hospitals' performance, CMS gathers the re-admission rates of all hospitals and uses them to calculate an average re-admission rate. To allow for statistical variation, the range of re-admission rates considered average includes rates that may be higher or lower than the exact average rate.

Finally, CMS compares individual hospitals' re-admission rates against the average re-admission rate. If a hospital falls into the average range, it is considered "no different than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's re-admission rate is higher than the average range, it is considered "worse than the U.S. national rate." If a hospital's re-admission rate is lower than the average range, it is considered "better than the U.S. national rate."

 

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