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Surgical Care Quality Reports

Surgery is an important part of health care. While it can improve and save patients' lives, it also carries a small risk of complications, such as surgical infections. Medical research has found many practices that can reduce the risk of surgical complications if followed properly.

Surgical Care Data

We follow strict guidelines that are proven by medical research to reduce the risk of surgical complications. The below chart lists some of the procedures we follow and shows how we compare to other hospitals.

Patients Using Beta-Blocker Therapy Prior to Arrival Who Received a Beta-Blocker Just Before Surgery

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Patients Using Beta-Blocker Therapy Prior to Arrival Who Received a Beta-Blocker Just Before Surgery

  • MU Health Care average - 99%
  • Missouri average - 98%
  • U.S. average - 98%

Patients often are taken off of their usual medications before and after their surgeries. However, some people take heart medications called beta blockers, which help lower blood pressure and control other medical conditions. Unlike with many other medications, beta blockers should continue to be taken through surgery. Without them, dangerous heart problems may develop.

Antibiotic Received Within One Hour Prior to Surgery

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Antibiotic Received Within One Hour Prior to Surgery

  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 99%
  • U.S. average - 99%

This measures the percentage of patients who are given an antibiotic within 120 or 60 minutes before surgery. Medical evidence shows that patients who receive antibiotics immediately before their surgeries are less likely to get surgical site infections. This window before surgery is the most effective time for a patient to get antibiotics to prevent infections.

Antibiotic Selection for Surgical Patients

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Antibiotic Selection for Surgical Patients

  • MU Health Care average - 100%

  • Missouri average - 99%

  • U.S. average - 98%

    This shows the percentage of patients who received the proper type of antibiotic medication before their surgeries. Medical research has shown that certain antibiotics work better to prevent surgical site infections for certain types of surgery. Hospital staff should make sure patients get the antibiotic that works best for their type of surgery.

Antibiotics Discontinued Within 24 Hours After Surgery End

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Antibiotics Discontinued Within 24 Hours After Surgery End 
  • MU Health Care average - 99%
  • Missouri average - 98%
  • U.S. average 98%

Medical research shows that surgery patients who get antibiotics before their surgeries are less likely to get surgical site infections. However, continuing antibiotics longer than necessary can increase the risk of side effects such as serious intestinal problems. It also can cause patients to develop infections that are resistant to antibiotics. This measure looks at the percentage of patients whose antibiotics were stopped at the right time, within 24 hours after their surgeries.

Urinary Catheter Removal on First or Second Day After Surgery

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Urinary Catheter Removal on First or Second Day After Surgery 
  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 100%

  • U.S. average - 100%

Sometimes a surgical patient needs to have a urinary catheter, a thin tube inserted into the bladder to help drain urine. Patients can develop dangerous infections when urinary catheters are left in place too long after surgery. Medical research shows that most surgery patients should have their urinary catheters removed within two days after surgery to help prevent infections. This measure shows the percentage of surgery patients whose catheters were removed on the first or second day after surgery.

Blood Clot Prevention Treatment Received Within 24 Hours Before or After Surgery

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Blood Clot Prevention Treatment Received Within 24 Hours Before or After Surgery

  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 99%
  • U.S. average - 99%

When people don't move for a long time, such as on a cross-ocean plane trip or after some types of surgeries, they are more likely to develop a dangerous blood clot in deep veins of the body. Those blood clots can break loose and travel through the bloodstream to vital organs such as the lungs, where they can cause serious damage. To help prevent blood clots after surgery, doctors can order treatments such as blood-thinning medications. However, the treatments need to be started at the right time, usually beginning 24 hours before surgery and ending 24 hours after surgery. This shows the percentage of patients who receive treatments at the right time to prevent blood clots.

Patients Having Surgery Who Were Actively Warmed In The Operating Room

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Patients Having Surgery Who Were Actively Warmed in the Operating Room
  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 100%
  • U.S. average - 100%

Some surgical wound infections and other complications can be prevented by keeping the patient's body temperature near normal during surgery. Medical research has shown that patients whose body temperatures drop during surgery have a greater risk of infection, and their wounds may not heal as quickly. Hospital staff should make sure that patients are actively warmed during and immediately after surgery to prevent a patient's bod temperature from dropping. This measure shows the percentage of patients whose body temperature was normal or near normal during the time period 15 minutes before the end of surgery and 30 minutes after surgical anesthesia ended.

Outpatients Who Received Antibiotics Before Surgery

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Outpatients Who Received Antibiotics Before Surgery
  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 99%
  • U.S. average - 99%

This measures the percentage of patients who are given an antibiotic within 120 or 60 minutes before outpatient surgery - patients who received surgery and went home afterward, not patients who stayed in the hospital as inpatients after surgery. Medical evidence shows that patients who receive antibiotics immediately before their surgeries are less likely to get surgical site infections. This window before surgery is the most effective time for a patient to get antibiotics to prevent infections.

Outpatients who received the most appropriate antibiotics

July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 data

Outpatients Who Received the Most Appropriate Antibiotics
  • MU Health Care average - 100%
  • Missouri average - 99%
  • U.S. average - 98%

This measures the percentage of patients who received the proper type of antibiotic medication before outpatient surgery - patients who received surgery and went home afterward, not patients who stayed in the hospital as inpatients after surgery. Medical research has shown that certain antibiotics work better to prevent surgical site infections for certain types of surgery. Hospital staff should make sure patients get the antibiotic that works best for their type of surgery.

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