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Botox Injection Before and After Photos

BOTOX Cosmetic

The methods for turning back the hands of time continue to evolve as new techniques and procedures make their way to the market. At Columbia Facial Plastic Surgery, our Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon and Nurse Clinician can uncover what you can expect to see in your quest for a more youthful appearance.

Fine lines and deep wrinkles found around the eyes “crow’s feet”, between the eyes “frown lines," and in the forehead can make you seem as if you are scowling or squinting. These dynamic wrinkles, which develop over time and become increasingly static, can present you to the world in a misunderstood negative light. The prescription medicine found in Botox Cosmetic is designed to eliminate this negative appearance and reveal your true, brighter self. Botox is the gold standard when it comes to wrinkle reduction and is the #1 performed cosmetic procedure in the world today.

What is Botox?

Botox injections have in recent years become the undisputedly most popular of all cosmetic procedures. Botox is the product name for injections containing a refined form of botulinum toxin. When injected into a muscle, the toxin blocks the nerve impulses that would normally cause that muscle to contract. The resulting absence or reduction of muscle contraction leaves the skin smoother and lends a more relaxed appearance to the patient’s facial features.

The many uses of Botox

The signs of aging that respond best to Botox injections are those lines and wrinkles caused by the repeated contractions of muscles used during facial expressions, especially those activated when we are frowning or squinting. Therefore, Botox is used most commonly for reduction of the appearance of frown lines between the brows, forehead furrows, and lines at the outer edge of the eye, commonly referred to as "crow's feet".

Who is a Good Candidate for Botox?

  • Patients who are showing early signs of aging.
  • Patients whose frown lines give them a tired, sad, or angry appearance.

Who is not a good candidate for Botox?

It is very important to disclose to your facial plastic surgeon any and all medications or supplements you may be taking, since the use of certain medications (antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, or aspirin) and even some vitamins and herbal supplements may increase bleeding and bruising at the injections sites.

Pregnant or nursing women should not get Botox injections. Also, any person with an infection present at or near the injection site should postpone treatment until the infection is resolved. Furthermore, there is a greatly increased risk of serious side effects in patients with any pre-existing neuromuscular disorder.

Risks and complications

Most complications are temporary and risks can be minimalized with proper injection techniques. The most common side effects of Botox injections include:

  • Temporary drooping of the eyelid
  • Headache
  • Localized pain, tenderness, or numbness at the injection site
  • Redness/swelling, and or bruising at the injection site
  • Recovery and Downtime

To avoid the spread of Botox outside the area of injection, patients should refrain from strenuous exercise as well as avoid rubbing the injected site for 12-24 hours after the procedure. There may be some swelling, redness or bruising at the injection sites, which usually only lasts a few hours, but can persist as long as 24-48 hours in highly sensitive patients.

Things to remember:

  • In most cases, it takes 3-7 days to fully realize the effect of the Botox injections.
  • The effects generally last for 3-4 months. Repeated treatments are required to maintain the results.
  • A small percentage of patients are reported to experience no improvement at all, demonstrating a sort of Botox immunity or resistance.

How is Botox administered?

To avoid the spread of Botox outside the area of injection, patients should refrain from strenuous exercise as well as avoid rubbing the injected site for 12-24 hours after the procedure. There may be some swelling, redness or bruising at the injection sites, which usually only lasts a few hours, but can persist as long as 24-48 hours in highly sensitive patients.

 

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