Pediatric Allergy Studies Now Enrolling

Little girl blowing her nose

Christine Franzese, MD, professor of clinical otolaryngology, and MU Health Care’s ENT and Allergy Center are offering two clinical trials for children suffering from allergies.

Pediatric polyps study

This clinical trial is for adolescents age 12-17 who suffer from nasal polyps and chronic sinusitis but have not been diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. Participants in this 28-week trial will be split into two groups. The first phase is 16 weeks long. The first randomly selected group will be given the XHANCE™ Delivery Device system and drug to help relieve symptoms. The second randomly selected group will be given a placebo drug. In the last 12 weeks, all participants will be given the XHANCE™ Delivery Device system and drug. All participants will be expected to come to seven appointments at the ENT and Allergy Center of Missouri and participate in two telephone calls with the research coordinator.

Other exclusions for this study may apply. This clinical trial is free to participants, and minimal monetary compensation will be provided. Parental consent is required.

House dust mites study

This clinical trial is for children who suffer from moderate to severe asthma and have had exacerbations within the past year. Children must be between the ages of 5-17 with parental consent and have tested positive for dust mites or have symptoms with or without positive allergy testing. Children cannot be on a biologic medication for asthma. Other exclusions may apply.

This study requires participants to place a tablet under their tongue. Participants will be randomly placed in two groups: One will be given medication, and the other will be given a placebo. All children and adolescents will be given background medication during this trial. Children and adolescents can expect to be in this trial for two years.

Enrollment begins soon for participation in fall 2019. This clinical trial is free to participants, and minimal monetary compensation will be provided. Children and adolescents can expect to be in this trial for two years once they are enrolled.